Tuesday, February 22, 2011

Post 43 - Claim - In my paper I am claiming that...

Blogging my evolution as an artistic art educator - An art-based experience...


Viewing identification issues through an evolving lens of inquiry informs pedagogy and personal change.


This is the theory that fuels my paper and is the driving force behind the reflection components of this blog. (This claim, by the way, was whittled down from three different claims, originally. And, cobbled together skillfully by myself, my friend Ann, and my husband... Talk about collaboration!)

I have identity issues. But, then again... Who doesn't?

Personal ones aside... I am focusing here, through this blog, if you had not surmised as much, and in my paper, on those identity issues that are directly connected to my teaching (pedagogy) and art making struggles. That is to say, "Do versus Teach".

You know... it's like that terribly old and mortifying saying, "Those that can't DO, teach"... I always get a sick feeling in my stomach, and a scrunched up expression on my face when I even think about that statement.

How many other art educators out there suffer, like I do, needlessly? Why do we have to make a choice?... Be an artist OR be a teacher...

I don't want to choose, shouldn't have to choose, and furthermore, claim that, as many others have claimed, that my art making enriches my teaching, and my teaching enriches my art making. I have witnessed this happening in my own life. So, for me, I know it is true. And, I am not alone... (This theoretical "proof" is the stuff that goes in my Literature Review... No, I am not procrastinating! Just skating around, getting closer and closer... But, I better get "on it", or I might skate myself right into a frozen pond! Ha!... Is that a crack in the ice?)

Well, anyhow... I thank you all for listening today, and for the kind and insightful comments from yesterday!

And, for your kindness, I leave you first with this quote, that Ann texted me the other day, because she knew I needed to stop pussy footin' around, and get writing...


"You gain strength, courage and confidence by every experience in which you really stop to look fear in the face."
- - - Eleanor Roosevelt


And, second, I leave you with a photo of my favorite pussycat... I wish I was Cosmo RIGHT NOW! (I am so not kidding... Yesterday, I really did look into that gorgeous, plump, self-satisfied, furry face and wish for a brief few seconds that I were he... Ahhhhhh!!!! To be paw-loose and fancy-free...)




Safety, health, happiness, and peace... Pam

6 comments:

lisa caudill said...

First, let me say thank you. Thank you for defining pedagogy. I learned a new word for the day! Second, never for a second did any of us think of you as less of an artist because you teach. Quite the opposite. You are passing along your passion to your students, awakening future artists. Who knows what the future holds for them? You may have just taught the next Da Vinci! And that future Da Vinci may never have been, if it weren't for you.

Ann said...

You are Da Vinci in female form!

Lisa said...

The phrase should be "Those that can do; those that CAN DO IT BETTER teach."

Teachers not only have to know their subject area well but they need to be able to pass that knowledge onto others. There is nothing more difficult than trying to teach and it doesn't matter what the lesson. Remember potty training your toddler. The ability to teach is a gift and very few have it!!!

Alexia said...

To be the devil's advocate for a moment, I think the idea of "those who can't, teach" can be true sometimes. Anyone studying the arts - both visual and performing - has come across frustrated artists leading their classes. In the performing arts, we're told that in order to pursue our craft truly, we must pursue it fully. That is, survival jobs must be flexible or dispensable, because you must spend every free moment studying and creating or you might as well hang it up. To be a professional performer AND a teacher, and give yourself fully to both, requires incredible time management skills, stamina, and desire. I know many professional performers who claim they are teachers, but they reschedule classes for gigs at the drop of a hat, because they have prioritized being an artist over teaching. I think the problem here is not "can you be an artist and teach art?" but... crying baby, have to come back to this.

Alexia said...

...but can you do both well, to the best of your ability, and with full commitment to both? Or do you always have to prioritize one over the other?

Lucia said...

That's an interesting point Alexia. I wonder if we can ever really be fully committed to any dual aspects of our personality, our identitiy, our passions. But isn't that something that is constantly in flux? How often do we switch between roles throughout our lives? So no, maybe one can't be the best artist that one can be every moment, but, by enriching our lives in other ways, and connecting with our artistic selves outside of our practice, we inform and stimulate our work as artists as well.